Andrée Gendron

 ©2018-2019 andreedianegendron.com

poetry RULES

one breath - haiku - senyru - tanka

cinquain - fibonacci - diamante

 

Basic syllable, word counts, directions and examples:

One Breath: start out with one word....(dots) then one or two imaginative definitions or feelings on the subject separated by dots. Able to recite without needing to take a breath.

Example:

shadows....dim memories....absence of light

They can also be any poem said (spoken or read) in one breath such as one complete sentence


Haiku: 5, 7, 5 syllables, any topic works but they are mostly about people, typically serious but not always. Seldom include capital letters except for formal nouns, nor proper punctuation of any kind.

Example:

four children - three swings
the brat, the youngest, their friend
and someone to push


Senyru: 5, 7, 5 syllables, usually about nature, typically humorous, cynical or dark

Example:

peanuts, seeds, or corn
squirrel ponders his choices
lunges, leaves, returns


(repeat verses over and over)


Tanka: 5. 7, 5, 7, 7 a haiku with an added statement used as a conclusion

Example:

you miss her don't you,
he asks a familiar face
all the time, they say
so then you knew my mother
no, but I still miss my wife


Cinquain: 1, 2, 3, 4, 1 stresses per line. The syllable rules are:
1 word noun with 2 syllables
4 syllables, adjectives
6 syllables, 'ing' action verb followed by result
8 syllables, expressing feeling
1 word, 2 syllables, synonym of line one noun

Example:

forest
old pines and hardwood
burns ‘til it's burned out
charred and bare, already whispers
woodland \I/ \I/ \I/

Fibonacci: 1, 1, 2 , 3 , 5 , 8 , 13   

Use the pattern created by Italian mathematician Leonardo Fibonacci. No other rules. The sequence is simple. Add two adjacent numbers for each verse: 1, 0+1=1, 1+1=2, 2+1=3, 2+3=5, 3+5=8, 5+8=13

Example:

time
tick
ticking
tick-tock-tick
never standing still
has no regard for history
not even here and now and promises no future


Diamante: 1, 2, 3, 4, 3, 2, 1 - this sequence shows word count, not syllable count
1st subject noun
2 adjectives about 1st subject noun
3 participles ending in 'ing' about 1st subject noun
4 nouns - 2 about 1st subject noun then 2 about 2nd subject noun
3 participles ending in 'ing' about 2nd subject noun
2 adjectives describing 2nd subject noun
2nd subject noun. Last and first words are opposites with the two adjacent lines pertaining to them

Example:

falls
falters, descends
stumbling, slipping, sliding
crumbles, crashes, resurrects, renews
clawing, clinging, climbing
reaches, ascends
rises

 

 

 

© 2018 - 2019 by Andrée Gendron

 

 

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easter egg 4